Enjoy vacations at these Atlanta metro bars


This may not be the best match for a selection of fresh oysters, but eggnog to watchman (99 Krog St., Atlanta. 404-254-0141, watchmansatl.com) is a dream after a ride on the Beltline. Miles Macquarrie blends marine rum (a blend of aged rums), pineapple rum, coconut, maple and nutmeg for a tropical vacation in one glass.

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Third Door on the Marietta Square pays homage to National Lampoon’s Christmas vacation with its pop-up menu, featuring eggnog with a blend of creamy sherry and nutty bitters. Courtesy of Whitney Flockart Photography

Credit: Whitney Flockart Photography

Third Door on the Marietta Square pays homage to National Lampoon's Christmas vacation with its pop-up menu, featuring eggnog with a blend of creamy sherry and nutty bitters.  Courtesy of Whitney Flockart Photography
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Third Door on the Marietta Square pays homage to National Lampoon’s Christmas vacation with its pop-up menu, featuring eggnog with a blend of creamy sherry and nutty bitters. Courtesy of Whitney Flockart Photography

Credit: Whitney Flockart Photography

Credit: Whitney Flockart Photography

All the fun vibes from the movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” are on the menu at the third door (131 Church St., Marietta. 470-361-0370, thethirddoor.net). Its pop-up tribute, dubbed A Church Street Vacation, has a version of nog that mixes cream, a mix of sherry, eggs, and nutty bitters.

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Deer and the Dove bartenders grate freshly ground nutmeg over their eggnog, served in an antique family-owned glass factory. Courtesy of Terry Koval

Credit: Terry Koval

Deer and the Dove bartenders grate freshly ground nutmeg over their eggnog, served in an antique family-owned glass factory.  Courtesy of Terry Koval
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Deer and the Dove bartenders grate freshly ground nutmeg over their eggnog, served in an antique family-owned glass factory. Courtesy of Terry Koval

Credit: Terry Koval

Credit: Terry Koval

Chef-owner Terry Koval made a light sign showing the way to Eggnog at The deer and the dove (155 Sycamore St., Decatur. 404-748-4617, deerdove.com). Mixture of bourbon, rum, brandy, egg, cream, sugar and spices, it is served in the antique glasses of Koval’s great aunt.

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El Super Pan serves a traditional Puerto Rican coquito until January 6 (Three Kings Day). Courtesy of El Super Pan

Credit: Handout

El Super Pan serves a traditional Puerto Rican coquito until January 6 (Three Kings Day).  Courtesy of El Super Pan
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El Super Pan serves a traditional Puerto Rican coquito until January 6 (Three Kings Day). Courtesy of El Super Pan

Credit: Handout

Credit: Handout

Meaning “little coconut,” a coquito is sometimes referred to as Island Eggnog or Puerto Rican Eggnog. For chef-owner Hector Santiago de El Super Pan (675 Ponce de Leon Ave. NE, Atlanta. 404-600-2465; 455 Legends Place, Atlanta. 404-521-6500, elsuperpan.com), coquito is a Christmas tradition served at home and in its restaurants. He creates this dense and silky drink with homemade spiced rum from Puerto Rico, coconut cream, coconut milk, eggs and spices (cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon).

You can sip a coquito made with 12 year old Flor de Cana rum in a glass milk jug on the terrace of Buena Vida Tapas + Sol, (385 N. Angier Ave. NE, Atlanta. 404-948-2312, buenavidatapas.com), nestled between Beltline and the historic Old Fourth Ward. It pairs well with one of the restaurant’s charcuterie boards or freshly made churros.

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Little Bear’s Vegan Pacanquito uses homemade dumpster seeds and pecan milks for the base, along with spicy brandy and overproof rum. Courtesy of Jarrett Stieber

Credit: Jarrett Stieber

Little Bear's Vegan Pacanquito uses homemade dumpster seeds and pecan milks for the base, along with spicy brandy and overproof rum.  Courtesy of Jarrett Stieber
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Little Bear’s Vegan Pacanquito uses homemade dumpster seeds and pecan milks for the base, along with spicy brandy and overproof rum. Courtesy of Jarrett Stieber

Credit: Jarrett Stieber

Credit: Jarrett Stieber

Little Bear (71 Georgia Ave., Atlanta. 404-500-5396, littlebearatl.com) has a vegan Pacanquito that’s edgy, with spicy brandy and overproof rum. It goes well with the food. Owner Jarrett Stieber said Summerhill Bar substitutes local dumpster seeds and pecans, which bar manager Charles Howk turns into milk, for coconut normally in a coquito.

To exploreAtlanta Orders In: Inside the Mind of Little Bear Chef Jarrett Stieber, Pandemic Edition
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You can buy a bottle of vegan coquito at LaRayia’s Bodega at the Ponce City Market. Courtesy of La Rayia

Credit: Handout

You can buy a bottle of vegan coquito at LaRayia's Bodega at the Ponce City Market.  Courtesy of La Rayia
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You can buy a bottle of vegan coquito at LaRayia’s Bodega at the Ponce City Market. Courtesy of La Rayia

Credit: Handout

Credit: Handout

Newly opened by LaRayia Bodega (675 Ponce de Leon Ave. NE, Atlanta. 404-900-7900, larayiasbodega.com) makes sipping a coquito at home easy and delicious. Black’s own organic and vegan boutique is all about the Caribbean flavor, and you’ll find it in the pretty bottle of coquito ready to go.

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Coconut Cartel will send you a kit of everything you need to make a coquito, a traditional coconut eggnog. Courtesy of Coconut Cartel

Credit: Brinson Renda

Coconut Cartel will send you a kit of everything you need to make a coquito, a traditional coconut eggnog.  Courtesy of Coconut Cartel
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Coconut Cartel will send you a kit of everything you need to make a coquito, a traditional coconut eggnog. Courtesy of Coconut Cartel

Credit: Brinson Renda

Credit: Brinson Renda

You can also try a coquito at home with a kit that includes aged Guatemalan rum cut-proof with fresh coconut water. Coconut Cartel teamed up with Coquito NYC to create the Holiday Drink Kit ($ 94.99 at shopcoconutcartel.com), which includes simple instructions and a bottle of Anejo rum, cans of sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk , organic coconut milk, vanilla extract, a signature blend of Coquito NYC spices, straws and four personalized glass bottles of coquito.

To exploreChange your nog this year by making a batch of coquito

Another Latin American drink, the rompope from Mexico, was first prepared by nuns in a 17th-century Puebla convent. It includes almond paste whipped in a base of milk, cinnamon and eggs, with or without rum. A bottled version of the drink is available at major liquor stores in the metro area.

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